A-List Couple

Meet the couple every Hong Kong fashionistas want to be friends with

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Shopping is a national sport of Hong Kong. So is lining up. If you merge the two together, you will get a recipe for success — at least according Diego Dultzin Lacoste and Delphine Lefay.

The French couple, who moved to the SAR three years ago, founded a flash sale business, On The List, a little more than a year ago, and have carved out a niche in a city which provides a staggering array of shopping options.

A recent event that Dultzin Lacoste and Lefay organized for British fashion label Ted Baker attracted 1,100 people in just two hours. Bargain hunters started to queue up as early as 6.30 am, waiting for an hour and a half to enter.

“The first time we did Ted Baker was during typhoon signal No 8. We really thought it would be a disaster,” Lefay recalled. “But we received phone calls throughout the day asking when we would open. The queue stretched two blocks.”

“We didn’t expect people would come out and shop but we discovered that Hong Kong people are really shopaholics,” added Dultzin Lacoste.

On The List operates on a business model different from traditional flash sale organizers. It does not have online retail but employs a bricks-and-mortar concept similar to outlet operators.

And rather than opening a store in the outskirts, they eyed prime shopping locations.

Two months ago, they set up a two- story shop on Duddell Street in Central, after a trial run of pop-up events. They plan to have other locations in central Kowloon and the mainland next year.

Another key concept is that On The List serves only registered customers. It currently has a membership base of 50,000 and has worked with many fashion and lifestyle labels – including Armani, Calvin Klein, Ferragamo, and Ports 1961.

Members have access to discounted past-season clothing, fashion accessories, electronics, and wines every week. The markdown averages about 75 percent.

“Each flash sale lasts three to four days. The time period protects the brand’s image. And from the brands’ point of view, they are able to sell all the inventory that they have in the warehouse,” Dultzin Lacoste explained.

The store can move a large volume of goods in days. They once helped Brazilian label Havaianas sell 13,000 pairs of flip flops in four days. “Some companies have stopped organizing flash sales themselves because we can sell a lot more,” Lefay said. “We are not competing with their outlets because we have items that can’t be found there.”

The business model that bridges luxury and mass market retail is not new. Dultzin Lacoste and Lefay got their idea from the success cases in France and the United States. But implementing the idea in a foreign market can be tricky.

It took Dultzin Lacoste and Lefay time to find the right strategy. The pair don’t always agree with one another.

In fact, when Dultzin Lacoste first met Lefay, they had a philosophical debate about rational and impulse purchase. Coming from a background in luxury retail, he valued sensibility over sense while she was in the mass marketing industry and preferred rationality.

“Delphine said her industry had much more figures to work with,” Dultzin Lacoste recalled the night they met. “I told her my industry made people dream. It was not only about the products, but the whole package and storytelling. So we had a big argument.”

Said Lefay: “I was not attracted by luxury brands because I could not afford them. I was 23 when we met, freshly out of university. Now, I can see why people are attracted to luxury products – with a good price. Diego has convinced me.”

Even so, the response from Hongkongers was a surprise. Brands have consigned expensive items, such as jewelry and watches. The most costly was a Frederique Constant watch priced at HK$450,000 before discount.

“The biggest order came from a woman who spent HK$92,000,” Dultzin Lacoste said. “She bought five items: a jacket and some jewelry. If she had bought them at the store, she would have paid a lot more for any one of those items.”

The married couple still fight over their own area of expertise. Said Dultzin Lacoste: “We argue about everything, which is good. But it’s more like we are brainstorming.”

Lefay agreed. “When we want to implement a new process, it always starts with an argument. When I want to insist on my idea, I sometimes don’t listen to Diego. But we are complementary.”

The article first appeared in the Standard on May 5, 2017.

 

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